Spring Planting: How to Transplant a seedling

Red Bravo strawberries after 10 days of planting

Red Bravo strawberries after 10 days of planting from seedling

IT IS SPRIIIIIIIIIIINNNNNNGGGG!

The dirt in the vermicomposter has been noshed on all Winter and is now heavy with nutrients and little red wigglers.  The local supermarkets are starting to sell plants by the dozen.

Which means that…

IT IS TIME FOR PLANTING!  (Woo hoo!)

This year, I’m planting some strawberries and pumpkins, the latter of which I got for free at the local cafe.  I’m really looking forward to a fruitful harvest.  Later, when the worms have completed more work, I’ll be planting some parsnips, which hopefully won’t shoot to seed straight away.  And, of course, eggplants, because eggplants are delicious when grilled with miso.

I usually try to grow my plants from seed, which means that before getting put into the main pot, they spend some time germinating in a small plastic germination pot.  When the roots grow out from the bottom of the germination pot, it’s time for transplanting!

An eggplant plant ready for transplanting

An eggplant plant ready for transplanting

Step 1:  Dig a Hole

FullSizeRender_1The first step to transplanting something is, of course, to dig a hole deep enough to put the plant in.  You will want to make it about 1-2 inches deeper and larger than the pot to make space for the roots.

Step 2:  Take off the Pot

FullSizeRender_3Next, remove the plant from the pot.  If it’s properly ready for transplanting, the plant’s roots should hold tightly to the soil in the pot.  This should make it easier to remove from the pot and it should come out smoothly.

Squeeze the soil at the bottom lightly to loosen the roots and the dirt before putting it into the soil.  You should cover up any exposed roots with dirt.

Step 3: Water liberally

FullSizeRender_4Finally, water the plant liberally until the soil has packed around the roots!

Make sure that the plant is kept in half sun for a few days before putting it in full sun, as transplanted plants tend to be a little fragile!

If you’re really into making lots of crop plants, you can look into companion planting, where two plants sharing the same pot don’t use the same nutrients to grow, thus helping each other grow!

Tomato and Eggplants together, not the best companions, but still suitable

Tomato and Eggplants together, not the best companions, but still suitable

Enjoy your spring planting!

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One thought on “Spring Planting: How to Transplant a seedling

  1. Pingback: Gardening Update: Strawberries and Punkin | Owls Well

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